Your Water Footprint

One issue that has not received the attention it deserves is the limited supply of water and the amount of it that is being wasted. Journalist Stephen Leahy has written Your Water Footprint: The Shocking Facts About How Much Water We Use to Make Everyday Products. It is full of startling statistics.front cover For example, did you know that it takes more than 7,600 liters (2,000 gallons) of water to make a single pair of jeans? That your morning cup of coffee required 140 litres (37 gallons) of water before it found its way to your table—water that was used to grow, process and ship the coffee beans? When we spend money on food, clothes, cellphones or even electricity, we are buying water — a shockingly large amount of water.

Water is more valuable and useful than oil

Your Water Footprint reveals how water is essential to our way of life in ways we never imagined. While water usage continues to soar, shortages now affect more than 3 billion people including millions of Americans and Canadians. A decade from now 3 out of 5 people will face water shortages.

Your Water Footprint provides essential information to reduce your water use which will help you save money, be prepared for shortages and ensure our children and grandchildren will have abundant fresh water. Water-wise choices is all about smart substitutions and changes, rather than sacrifice and self-denial.

Karen Mahon was interviewed on The Current (Friday September 30, 2016 ) and was very critical of the LNG pipeline approval:

Environmentalist Karen Mahon tells The Current's Friday host Laura Lynch she's disappointed in the Liberals' LNG decision because this sends the wrong message to the rest of the world.

"We have alternatives here...

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According to this study, Canada’s extracted carbon has risen dramatically, almost exclusively because of our country’s growing fossil fuel exports. Extracted carbon emissions from Canada increased 26 per cent from 2000 to 2014. In 2015, Canada’s extracted carbon equalled almost 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide.

Canadian climate policy must consider supply-...

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The third essay in a series by Bill Henderson

This third essay on my new metaphor for effectively treating climate change is about climate change being potentially fatal for all we know and love, potentially fatal for civilization as we know it, maybe even for humanity itself. Do we need to consider a major disruption in our society and economy for effective treatment of what could be a fatal disease?

Cancer, without...

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The second in a series by Bill Henderson

Stop supporting fake mitigation. Let’s remove the Golden Straitjacket and start the regulated fossil-fuel wind-down.

I watch foreign tourists in awe on the ferry and see it through their eyes. Our country works. Hey, not perfectly… the ferry is almost always a little late because of the volumes; the bus is often crowded. I have been stuck on the Lions Gate bridge behind an accident (people were kind, considerate). If you escape...

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The first in a series by Bill Henderson

An open letter to Pam Goldsmith-Jones, MP

Hello again Ms. Goldsmith-Jones,

At a climate meeting you arranged at Gibsons Yacht Club before the election I said I thought you were in what Kari Norgaard describes as implicatory denial: climate change itself is not denied but "the psychological, political and moral imperatives that conventionally follow". And then...

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